Hydrangeas

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Today we're here to tell you a little bit about hydrangeas. Though our own hydrangea bushes only began to flower this season, we have had many weddings bedecked with these lavish beauties over the years. You can find these rich blooms growing on shrubs, and ranging in color from white, to pink, to purple or even blue, all depending on how acidic the soil is. Here are a few tips on working with hydrangea for floral arrangements:

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  • Before cutting your hydrangea stems, you want to be sure that the plant was well watered a day ahead of time. The word 'Hydrangea' comes from the root word 'hydra' meaning water. In other words, this plant loves water!
  • It's best to cut hydrangea in the morning or evening when the temperatures are not as intense. If you cut your blooms in the middle of the day, the bush may be stressed from the heat and your flowers won't last as long.
  • After cutting, place stems directly into warm water and then straight into a cooler or refrigerator. Be careful though, the ethylene emitted from produce can damage your flowers! If you do not have access to refrigeration, simply place stems in cool water treated with flower food.
  • If your blooms begin to wilt prematurely, do not fret! There may still be hope! We have found that giving the stems a fresh cut, and then placing them in warm water has revived hydrangea in the past.
  • With freshly cut hydrangeas in water, you can usually enjoy their blooms for about a week. This flower however, does not do well in floral foam (oasis) and will only last about 12-36 hours in foam.

We hope you enjoy these bountiful beauties!

 

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